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Situational and psycho-social factors associated with relapse following residential detoxification in a population of Irish opioid dependent patients.

Creator:

Kevin Ducray, Catherine D Darker, Bobby P Smyth

Type: Report
Region: Republic of Ireland
Northern Ireland
Description:

Aims: To identify and describe the context and factors involved in the opioid lapse process following discharge from an Irish inpatient opioid detoxification treatment programme. Design, participants, setting: Prospective follow-up study of consecutive detoxified opioid dependent patients treated in a specialist inpatient drug dependency unit. Measurements: The Maudsley Addiction Profile and a structured interview were administered to 109 patients, 18â?"36 months after discharge. Findings: Of 109 people interviewed at follow-up, 102 (94%) reported at least one episode of opioid use after leaving the residential treatment programme. Eighty eight patients (86% of the lapsers) identified more than one major factor contributing to their recidivism. The median number of factors identified as having a major role in the lapse was four. The most frequently reported major contributors to lapse were low mood (62%), difficulties with craving (62%), ease of access to heroin (48%) and missing the support of the treatment centre (43%). Conclusions: Early lapse was common following inpatient treatment of opioid dependence. Lapse tended to result from a number of common, identifiable, high-risk situations, feelings and cognitions which may assist clinicians and patients develop lapse prevention strategies to anticipate and interrupt this process.

Date:

01/01/2012

Rights: Public
Suggested citation:

Kevin Ducray, Catherine D Darker, Bobby P Smyth. (2012) Situational and psycho-social factors associated with relapse following residential detoxification in a population of Irish opioid dependent patients. [Online]. Available from: http://www.thehealthwell.info/node/366576 [Accessed: 16th December 2018].

  

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Contributor:

National Drugs Library
 
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